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The United States Government: The Congress: Video Links to the U.S. Congress

Overview of the two branches of the U.S. Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives, including resources on the history of the legislative body.

United States Congress Explained

Published on Feb 27, 2013

Barrecan.com

In this episode we explain the legislative branch, also known as "Congress" of the United States government. This is part of a ongoing series explaining varies aspects of American government, and politics.

For more videos explaining American government visit:
Barrecan.com

Explaining the United States Congress

Published on Apr 29, 2016

It happens every two years, it is time to talk about Congress. This video talks about what Congress can do and how to become part of Congress. All for your enjoyment

The Bicameral Congress: Crash Course Government and Politics #2

Published on Jan 30, 2015

In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the United States Congress, and why it's bicameral, and what bicameral means. Craig tells you what the Senate and House of Representatives are for, some of the history of the institutions, and reveal to you just how you can become a representative. It's not that easy. But an eagle gets punched, so there's that.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios

The U.S. Congress in Twenty Minutes (1 of 2)

Uploaded on May 17, 2009

A broad overview of Congressional content on the United States History exam in Regents, NY State. Topics include delegated power, the Great Compromise, the Electoral College, House of Representation Ideas, the U.S. Senate as well as unwritten constitution topics.

The U.S. Congress in Twenty Minutes (2 of 2)

Uploaded on May 17, 2009

A broad overview of Congressional content on the United States History exam in Regents, NY State. Topics include delegated power, the Great Compromise, the Electoral College, House of Representation Ideas, the U.S. Senate as well as unwritten constitution topics.

Constitutional History Lecture 11: The First Congress

Published on Jun 18, 2013

Kevin Gutzman, author of James Madison and the Making of America, discusses the First Congress, which dealt with the Bill of Rights, the Judiciary Act, and the beginnings of the Cabinet departments. For more lectures in this series, visit http://www.LibertyClassroom.com/Const....

For all our courses, visit http://www.LibertyClassroom.com.
http://www.TomWoods.com

The History of the United States Capitol

Uploaded on Oct 27, 2010

The United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., is among the most architecturally impressive and symbolically important buildings in the world. It has housed the meeting chambers of the Senate and the House of Representatives for almost two centuries. Since the laying of the cornerstone in 1793, the Capitol has been built, burnt, rebuilt, extended, and restored; today, it stands as a monument not only to its builders but also to the American people and their government. Learn more at: http://www.aoc.gov/cc/capitol/index.cfm.

Congressional Committees: Crash Course Government and Politics #7

Published on Mar 6, 2015

This week Craig Benzine clears up the role of committees in Congress. We’ll talk about standing committees, joint committees, conference committees, and caucuses (and not the candidate-choosing kinds) as well as the staff agencies that help advise these committees and congresspeople. As most bills never even make it to the house and senate floors for a vote, the role of committees, and their respective chairpersons as gatekeeper is pretty important. There’s a lot to demystify here as the legislative process can seem pretty arcane at times, but the model, at least in theory, helps Congress run more efficiently.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios

Congressional Apportionment

Published on Jun 10, 2013

Have you ever wondered who decides that California gets 53 seats in the House of Representatives while Virginia gets 11 and Wyoming only one? The apportionment process uses a complicated formula to make that decision, but The Citizen Genius Project makes it easy to understand. In this lesson, find out how the 435 seats in the House are redistributed among the 50 states every 10 years as the U.S. population changes.