This is the "Introduction" page of the "Community Read: The Works of William Shakespeare" guide.
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Huntsville-Madison County Public Library

Community Read: The Works of William Shakespeare   Tags: comedy, community read 2014, drama, renaissance drama, tragedy, william shakespeare  

Research guide comprised of an assemblage of online and print resources devoted to the plays and poetry of William Shakespeare.
Last Updated: Apr 4, 2014 URL: http://guides.hmcpl.org/shakespearecommunityread Print Guide RSS Updates

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Introduction

The Huntsville-Madison County Public Library has sponsored a community read project annually since 2002. Every spring, the library encourages everyone in Madison County to read the same book or explore the work of one particular author. In support of this initiative, the library and partnering community groups sponsor lectures, book talks, discussions, film screenings, exhibits, concerts, and family events related to elements and themes of the selected book.


Please join us as we dedicate the month of April 2014 to William Shakespeare, one of the most beloved and recognized authors in the world, in honor of his 450th birthday.

 

Event Guide

Adult Events

Book Discussions

Film Screenings

Children & Family Events

Teen Events

Further Resources

 

 

For additional resources

For additional resources on William Shakespeare visit 'The World of William Shakespeare' at

http://guides.hmcpl.org/theworldofwilliamshakespeare

 

The Works of William Shakespeare

 

Community Read 2014

The Works of William Shakespeare


 

William Shakespeare was born in Statford-upon-Avon on or about April 23, 1564. His father was a merchant who devoted himself to public service, attaining the highest of Stratford's municipal positions—that of bailiff and justice of the peace—by 1568. Biographers have surmised that the elder Shakespeare's social standing and relative prosperity at this time would have enabled his son to attend the finest local grammar school, the King's New School, where he would have received an outstanding classical education under the direction of highly regarded masters. There is no evidence that Shakespeare attended university. In 1582, at the age of eighteen, he married Ann Hathaway of Stratford, a woman eight years his senior. Their first child, Susanna, was born six months later, followed by twins, Hamnet and Judith, in 1585. These early years of Shakespeare's adult life are not well documented; some time after the birth of his twins, he joined a professional acting company and made his way to London, where his first plays, the three parts of the Henry VI history cycle, were presented in 1589–1591. The first reference to Shakespeare in the London literary world dates from 1592, when dramatist Robert Greene alluded to him as "an upstart crow." Shakespeare further established himself as a professional actor and playwright when he joined the Lord Chamberlain's Men, an acting company formed in 1594 under the patronage of Henry Carey, Lord Hunsdon. The members of this company included the renowned tragedian Richard Burbage and the famous "clown" Will Kempe, who was one of the most popular actors of his time. This group began performing at the playhouse known simply as the Theatre and at the Cross Keys Inn, moving to the Swan Theatre on Bankside in 1596 when municipal authorities banned the public presentation of plays within the limits of the City of London. Three years later Shakespeare and other members of the company financed the building of the Globe Theatre, the most famous of all Elizabethan playhouses. By then the foremost London Company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men also performed at Court on numerous occasions, their success largely due to the fact that Shakespeare wrote for no other company.

In 1603 King James I granted the group a royal patent, and the company's name was altered to reflect the King's direct patronage. Records indicate that the King's Men remained the most favored acting company in the Jacobean era, averaging a dozen performances at Court each year during the period. In addition to public performances at the Globe Theatre, the King's Men played at the private Blackfriars Theatre; many of Shakespeare's late plays were first staged at Blackfriars, where the intimate setting facilitated Shakespeare's use of increasingly sophisticated stage techniques. The playwright profited handsomely from his long career in the theater and invested in real estate, purchasing properties in both Stratford and London. As early as 1596 he had attained sufficient status to be granted a coat of arms and the accompanying right to call himself a gentleman. By 1610, with his fortune made and his reputation as the leading English dramatist unchallenged, Shakespeare appears to have retired to Stratford, though business interests brought him to London on occasion. He died on April 23, 1616, and was buried in the chancel of Trinity Church in Stratford.

Excerpted from

"William Shakespeare." LitFinder Contemporary Collection. Detroit: Gale, 2007. LitFinder. Web. 4 Mar. 2014.  
[available in fullt-text via the Alabama Virtual Library]

 

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